The Best Part of an Ending is a New Beginning

The Best Part of an Ending is a New Beginning

The best part of an ending is the new beginning! But before we close the door we'll take one final look - after all, 2017 was the real beginning for Destination: Wildlife. What a great beginning it was! We explored where to see mountain gorillas in Uganda, Asiatic lions in India, bald eagles in Mayland, snowy owls in New York, wild wolves in Alaska and more. We visited Prince of Wales Island Alaska, the western Everglades and welcomed two new Team members. What's next? Take a look. 

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Once-In-A-Lifetime Wrong Turn Brings Opportunity & Catastrophe

Once-In-A-Lifetime Wrong Turn Brings Opportunity & Catastrophe

When a lone corncrake migrating from Europe to Africa gets blown across the Atlantic Ocean it is a rare opportunity for birdwatchers and wildlife photographers in Long Island, New York's Cedar Beach. The viewers were responsible, but an Ocean Parkway driver spelled catastrophe in the dark. Long Island's south shore is home to snowy egrets, clapper rails, gulls, and hawks like the merlin and many other species. 

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Collision With A Glass Tower. What Happens Next?

Collision With A Glass Tower. What Happens Next?

New York City hosts over 200 wild bird species but only one place that helps them when they are sick or hurt: The Wild Bird Fund. Sales of The 2018 Wild New York Calendar, featuring the photography of Dennis Newsham of TouristPicsNYC, supports the Wild Bird Fund. From gun shot Snowy Owls to starving juvenile Red Tail Hawks to warblers dazed from collisions with glass towers, the Wild Bird Fund is there when our wild birds need help. 

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A True Tale of the Crazy Lost Bird in New Jersey

A True Tale of the Crazy Lost Bird in New Jersey

When wildlife photographer, Joe Gliozzo headed to birdwatching heaven at Cape May's Heislersville Wildlife Management Area on the New Jersey side of the Delaware Bay, he was expecting to find their famous raptors: bald eagles, peregrine falcons, Coopers and sharp-shinned hawks, or maybe some of shore birds who rest in the salt marshes on their annual migration. He did not expect was a spunky pink spoonbill who obviously took a wrong turn in a confiscated Bald Eagle nest! 

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After Irma, What Happened to the Wildlife & How Can You Help?

After Irma, What Happened to the Wildlife & How Can You Help?

What happens to wildlife when a hurricane or natural disaster strikes? Wildlife are dependent on their shrinking habitat to survive. And responsible tourism is the best long-term answer to many wildlife conservation issues. This is certainly true in the hard hit Western Everglades where small family-owned nature tourism companies are also fighting to survive the impact of Hurricane Irma. The answer for saving wildlife, fragile habitats, and human communities may ultimately depend on responsible travelers like you.

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What is the Value of Nature and Wildlife?

What is the Value of Nature and Wildlife?

What is the value of nature and wildlife tourism? You might be surprised to learn that it is one of the world's leading and fastest growing industries, bringing socio-economic benefit to places as diverse as the United States and Uganda. The benefits of wildlife tourism also include species conservation - and lower blood pressure for the participants. 

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